Rescued Pit Bull puppies and other dogs make up a large portion of the animals that Brookfield sees on a regular basis. Once overlooked, placed in shelters, and sometimes even slated for death, the rescued patients of Brookfield occupy a large portion of our clients’ hearts.

 

Why Do Cities Spend So Much Money on Strays?

 

Most states and cities have some kind of shelter program in place because stray companion animals represent a big safety and health risk to communities. Reservoirs for disease, the potential for attack, and a drag on police, fire department and health official resources; it’s not just unwise to allow stray animals to continue to roam, it’s expensive.

 

Shelter’s Cost Municipalities Millions

 

But it’s expensive to manage them too. According to the ASPCA website, 6.5 million pets travel through various U.S. shelter systems representing tens of millions of dollars in costs. New York City alone spends more than 7 million dollars a year managing its stray population, though novel, non-kill approaches to managing these sheltered animals has dramatically reduced the number of pets in shelters over the years. One thing is clear, the best way to save society against the expense and threat of stray animals is to spay or neuter your pet and to provide him or her a microchip.  Not to overstate an issue, but did you know that cats represent only a fraction of the animals ever returned to their rightful owner?  Why?  No microchip.

 

NYC puts its feral cat population to work to control the rat population.  Read More.

 

How Much Does Connecticut Spend On Stray Animals?

 

The State of Connecticut through various not-for-profit and state programs spends well over 10 million dollars a year on the state’s stray population. Exact data on how many animal lives benefit from that investment is not clear, but Connecticut’s largest shelter, the Connecticut Humane Society, has some pretty compelling evidence that their work saves lives (in 2015 alone, 5,513 animals were adopted out of the shelter system) and succeeds at fulfilling their mission (an unbelievable 96% of the animals taken into the Connecticut Humane Society are released back to their owners or adopted out to new ones.) Additional shelters in Connecticut that help our communities humanely manage stray animals include Animal Haven (it has been around for more than 65 years!), the New Haven Animal Shelter, West Haven Animal Shelter, the Animal Welfare Society, Tails of Courage, the Danbury Animal Welfare Society, The Companion Pet Rescue, Ridgefield Operation for Animal Rescue, and the SPCA of Connecticut. Click here to view all dogs and cats available for adoption in the Brookfield Connecticut area.

 

Read the entire 2015 Connecticut Humane Society Annual Report here.

 

Shelters House Lots of Pit Bulls and Pit Bull Mixed Breed Dogs

 

Pit bulls or American Staffordshire Terriers and mixes of AST’s represent a large portion of dogs that end up in shelters. Reasons vary, but the driving force is a failure on pet owners’ part to spay or neuter their dogs and to provide this powerful breed the kind of structure and training it requires to be a well behaved member of our society.  It is a myth that Pit Bulls are by nature aggressive as most Pit Bull owners will tell you. According to the AKC, Pit bulls are highly intelligent, excellent with children, friendly and personable.

 

What Happens To Dogs That Go To Shelters?

 

Inside most shelter systems, stray dogs are evaluated by veterinarians to see if they can be adopted out to families. They must be free of major disease, behavioral issues and relatively young; otherwise…tragically…they are euthanized.

 

Download a Certificate for 50% off your rescued/adopted pet’s first exam fee at Brookfield

 

Mostly It Comes Down to Good Manners

 

Rescue organizations spend a lot of time evaluating behavior as part of the decision to decide whether Pit Bulls (and all other dogs for that matter) can be adopted out. Veterinary professionals test dogs’ comfort with men in suits and uniforms, Halloween masks, children, and other dogs and cats. They evaluate how patient the dogs are with touching and with removing or moving around their food while eating (food aggression). Pit Bulls and dogs in general don’t have to be perfect to be adopted out, but professionals must be confident that once adopted, they will not be a menace.

 

 

What’s Your Story?

 

Brookfield clients cherish the day they first met their Pit Bull rescue puppy or dog.  Share the story of your first meeting below. Also check out the video below for three good tips when adopting a dog.

 

 

Download a Certificate for 50% off your rescued/adopted pet’s first exam fee at Brookfield