Dentistry

Brookfield animal hospital and Dentistry for Cats and Dogs

Check out these choppers!

Disease-free mouths keep pets living longer and healthier lives. Brookfield Animal Hospital affordably cleans your pet’s teeth and teaches you to keep them that way. Let’s get started.

Dental disease is not only the most common disease in dogs and cats but also one of the most preventable. Studies show that over 80% of the pet population has periodontal disease often starting by the age of 2.

Does my pet really need to have his/her teeth cleaned?

Like all of us, pets need regular teeth cleanings to prevent bad breath and to remove plaque and tartar that cause disease and infection. Pets can’t brush their own teeth – imagine what your mouth would feel like if you never brushed or saw a dentist! Also, pets accumulate plaque and tartar 5 times faster than we do. Bad breath is one consequence, but dental disease can also be painful and shower the mouth and internal organs with dangerous bacteria. As this bacteria is swallowed, it reaches internal organs where it can cause problems with your pet’s liver, kidneys, and heart. By keeping up a regular dental cleaning and home care, you can dramatically improve your pet’s quality and even length of life, but at some point, just like us, your pet should have its teeth cleaned.

What if I don’t get my dog or cat’s teeth cleaned?

Without a doubt, if you have medium to large sized breed dog or cat, 8 years or older, there will be significant gum redness, plague build up and infection in his or her mouth.  If you have a small dog, the chances that you will ‘flip the lip’ and find much worse is very high.  Small dogs have teeth that are tightly packed together and the many nooks and crannies between the teeth naturally hold food particles and cause dental disease.  Take a moment and watch this excellent video by veterniarian Cindy Charlier with the American Veterinary Medical Association.  You’ll see how to look for signs of periodontal disease in your own pets and learn about oral disease and general oral health.

 

What’s involved with having my pet’s teeth cleaned by a vet?

Brookfield Animal Hospital  begins with an assessment of your pet’s mouth, gums, and teeth. After the examination, we’ll let you know if we observe signs of periodontal disease and provide you home care instructions or an estimate for a professional cleaning here at our hospital.  Because these assessments are most often done at the same time as your pet’s annual wellness check up, we’ll be able to use the results of your pet’s annual early-disease detection screen to double as a pre-anesthetic screen for the dental cleaning.  This reduces the final cost of professional cleaning by as much as 20% or more!

On the day of the cleaning, your pet will be placed under general anesthesia, monitored continually by a dedicated, licensed veterinary nurse and veterinarian, and have his or her teeth cleaned.  At the same time, we’ll also take dental x-rays to make sure that we’re catching the hidden dental disease that lies below the gum line.

Here’s a complete list of what all pet’s receive during your their dentistry at Brookfield Animal Hospital.

  • An anesthetic plan that is individually tailored for each pet’s age, breed and health status. It will also include any pain management medications that the doctor may order.
  • An examination of every tooth and the entire gum line.
  • Full mouth x-rays to determine the level of disease below the gum line
  • Removal of tartar accumulation under the gum line and on each tooth
    with ultrasonic cleaning (it’s the same device human dentists use on us!)
  • Measuring gum recession and probing of any pockets around each tooth to determine if any infection is present
  • Removal of any hopelessly diseased and infected teeth
  • Polishing of all teeth to prevent future plaque buildup
  • A home care plan tailored to your pet’s needs to keep additional plaque accumulation minimal.

Should I have my pet’s teeth cleaned?  Yes!

Most pets are great at hiding pain and discomfort. Even pets with painful mouths will usually continue to eat, so it can be difficult to tell if your pet is experiencing any dental problems. With careful therapy, a diseased mouth can become clean and healthy once again, plus we can show you how to continue good oral health for your pet at home. Combined together, regular, professional dental cleanings and home care can  improve your pet’s quality and length of life and also reduce treatment costs down the road.

Bonus BITE.  You have to watch veterinarian, Dr. Ira Luskin do a dentistry on a Polar Bear!!!