Surgery

Surgery for your pet? Find out how Brookfield Animal Hospital does everything it can to eliminate the risks of anesthesia and other risks associated with surgery.

 

Affordable Spay and Neuter surgery starts with an examination

No physical exam required? Unacceptable. All surgical patients are fully evaluated prior to surgery to ensure their well-being. Here a Brookfield nurse gets Carl comfortable prior to his examination by Dr. Mike Dattner.

Safety First!

Prior to surgery, we review the patient’s entire medical history and do a comprehensive physical examination.  By nature, anesthesia depresses the body’s ability to do what it needs to do to stay alive: temperature drops, respiration rate drops and heart rate drops. If your pet has an underlying condition, however small, it can become a much bigger issue under anesthesia since the body’s ability to accommodate for it has been compromised.  We do a comprehensive physical examination prior to anesthesia so that we can look for anything that might get in the way of a safe anesthetic experience for your pet.  As an additional precaution, we take the added time to pre-calculate the doses of any drugs that we would need in case of an emergency. If, for whatever reason, your pet doesn’t respond well under anesthesia, we’ll have everything we need at hand to immediately intervene.

 

Patients are given three stages of anesthesia, each of which is customized specifically for him or her.  Pre-anesthetic medications reduces anxiety and minimizes the amount of anesthesia we’ll need to give to induce your pet into sleep.  The second stage of anesthesia is called induction.  This is an injectable anesthesia that makes your pet fall into sleep.  The third and last stage of anesthesia is an inhaled gas, the same kind that you or I would get if we had surgery, that maintains the pet in a safe plane of pain free sleep.  Our anesthesia protocols are the same as prescribed by our nation’s standard of veterinary excellence, the American Animal Hospital Association of which we are an accredited member.  For more information, read what our governing body, the American Veterinary Medical Association says about anesthetic safety.

 

Find affordable spay or neuter surgery for my pet

 

Recovering a Pet After Surgery?

During your pet’s surgery and while he or she recovers we monitor all the ‘vital’ signs of life:  heart rate, respiratory rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, body temperature, carbon dioxide levels, pain levels and pulses.  These measurements are taken continuously throughout the procedure and recorded in the medical chart.

Safe Affordable surgery for your pet at Brookfield animal hospital

During all surgeries, there is one person (here, it’s Amy on the left) that’s dedicated to monitoring a patient’s vital signs continually throughout the procedure AND after

Surprisingly, patients that experience difficulty with anesthesia, most often experience it while they are recovering.  As we mentioned earlier, anesthesia lowers the body’s ability to do what it needs to do (breathe, stay warm, pump blood).  In recovery, patients are no longer receiving oxygen as they were when they were having their surgery.  If their body is too chilly or if their respiration is too depressed, pets can have post surgery complications.  This is why we insist that all patients are monitored  on a one-on-one basis after surgery until they are fully awake and sitting up.  We measure patients’ temperature, pulse and respiration every 15 minutes after surgery until all three of these important measurements have returned to normal.

 

Will My Pet Be Painful After Surgery?

Pain is another important parameter that is assessed.  No pet at our practice suffers if we can help it.  Before the surgical procedure even begins, we’ll give your pet treatment for pain BEFORE they’re painful. Stopping pain before it occurs reduces your pet’s anxiety levels and speeds along the recovery process.

 

How To Care For A Pet After Surgery

As soon as we’ve recovered your pet, we’ll phone and let you know that everything is okay and give you a time when you can return to the practice to take your baby home.  When you arrive, a surgery nurse will go over any medications that your pet needs to take and other home care instructions. These instructions will be written down for you to take home,But you can phone the practice at any time if you have concerns.

 

Estimated Cost of Spaying, Neutering and Other Surgeries

Accredited practices sometimes take it on the chin when it comes to price shopping for surgery. Our clients want to know why surgery costs can vary so widely between accredited practices and non-accredited practices and typically the cost difference is a reflection of the added safety steps that we take to ensure your pet’s well-being.At Brookfield, we’ve agreed to do everything we can to keep pets safe under anesthesia, to minimize pain, and to ensure that animals in our care feel safe and secure.  Some veterinary hospitals give clients options like the ‘Cadillac’ or ‘Gold Standard’ plan when it comes to surgery, but how can Brookfield, in good conscience, give anything LESS than the very best care?   Providing less-that-ideal care in any situation means that we are risking the life and well-being of an animal.  After 20 years of dedicating ourselves to animal welfare and working so hard to be great at what we do, we simply can’t settle for ‘okay’ standards.

If you receive an estimate for a surgery procedure at our practice that you believe is too high, or higher than estimates you received elsewhere, please talk to us about the services shown on the estimate.  Everything we do for pets at our practice is in their best interest and it’s the best that we want for you and your pet.  If our estimates  are outside your budget, let’s not scale down your pet’s care to accommodate, but find a payment solution that will work for you.